A Review on Patient Diet Management for Chronic Kidney Disease Based on Clinical Trials

Authors

  • Dharmendrakumar H. Prajapati Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology, Smt. S.S. Patel Nootan Science and Commerce College, Sankalchand Patel University, Visnagar, India
  • Mahenk D. Patel Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology, Smt. S.S. Patel Nootan Science and Commerce College, Sankalchand Patel University, Visnagar, India
  • Hitesh H. Mehta Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology, Smt. S.S. Patel Nootan Science and Commerce College, Sankalchand Patel University, Visnagar, India
  • Dhaval A. Patel Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sankalchand Patel Engineering College, Sankalchand Patel University, Visnagar, India
  • Dhruv P. Dave Student, Department of Biotechnology, Smt. S.S. Patel Nootan Science and Commerce College, Sankalchand Patel University, Visnagar, India
  • Jinil R. Patel Student, Department of Microbiology, Smt. S.S. Patel Nootan Science and Commerce College, Sankalchand Patel University, Visnagar, India
  • Inam Z. Bushal Student, Department of Biotechnology, Smt. S.S. Patel Nootan Science and Commerce College, Sankalchand Patel University, Visnagar, India
  • Anil V. Patani Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology, Smt. S.S. Patel Nootan Science and Commerce College, Sankalchand Patel University, Visnagar, India

Keywords:

Calcium, Chronic kidney disease, Phosphate, Potassium, Protein, Sodium

Abstract

The public health issue of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is especially acute in India. Only 10% of patients with incident end stage renal disease (ESRD) cases receive therapy in India due to limited availability and expensive costs. To best manage CKD, ensure a sufficient intake of protein and energy, prevent or correct protein-energy wasting, and optimise nutritional management of CKD, a balanced and personalised low protein diet (LPD) approach should be developed. The relationship between mineral intake and chronic renal disease has only been briefly studied (CKD). In a cross-sectional analysis, the Health Examinee (HEXA) cohort of the Korean Genome and Epidemiologic Study was used to examine the relationship between mineral intake (calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, iron, and zinc) and CKD (KoGES). A food frequency questionnaire was used to determine the mineral consumption of 159,711 participants. An estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 was used to characterise CKD. Each mineral's dietary intake was separated into quartiles, with the quartile containing the acceptable intake (AI) or recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of each mineral serving as the reference. As a result, every effort should be taken to stop the progression of CKD. The study has shown to require analyses of food variance, nutritional demand changes, and variation in dietary intake in order to strengthen the links between nutrient consumption and renal function. This review article examines the function of low protein diets (LPD) in the treatment of CKD patients and offers advice on how to use them in clinical settings. It also discusses the relationship between inadequate mineral consumption and the prevalence of CKD in the general population.

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Published

29-11-2022

Issue

Section

Articles

How to Cite

[1]
D. H. Prajapati, “A Review on Patient Diet Management for Chronic Kidney Disease Based on Clinical Trials”, IJRESM, vol. 5, no. 11, pp. 174–181, Nov. 2022, Accessed: Jun. 17, 2024. [Online]. Available: https://journal.ijresm.com/index.php/ijresm/article/view/2445